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Aromatic accord in perfumery

Aromatic accord in perfumery

Later, aromatic herbs were also used as raw materials to reveal predictions. The first real scent accords for beauty products made their appearance in the Middle Ages; a trend which was greatly amplified in the 17th century. From then on, aromatic herbs entered the composition of the traditional Eau de Cologne, very popular in the last century and constituting the beginnings of our current perfumery. In other words, the aromatic accord is a scent that is almost ingrained in our DNA. It is a timeless one that appeals to all generations, whether it is a female or male audience. The...

Absinthe in perfumery

Absinthe in perfumery

Absinthe, a plant that has become a strong alcohol Absinthe is a perennial herbaceous plant measuring between 50 cm and 1 m. This is covered with silky white and silvery hairs as well as numerous oil glands. Its leaves are silky on the underside while their tops are gray and greenish. Its flowers are yellow and tubular, united in flower heads. Although this is aromatic, it remains much more famous for its liquor than for its plant properties as such. However, wormwood turns out to be a plant with many medicinal properties as well as an excellent repellent for the...

Star anise in perfumery

Star anise in perfumery

Star anise, Chinese fennel or even star anise The star anise, fruit of the badan tree native to China, was brought back from its Asian land by the famous Marco Polo. However, its use intensified only several centuries later, star anise being expensive and having a bad reputation for attracting rodents in times of plague. Yet star anise or star anise, had a famous lover who lost her mind… Marie-Antoinette! She cultivated the badanier quite simply for its aesthetic aspect and for the divine smell of its fruits once dry. It was not until the 18th century that we really...

Anise in perfumery

Anise in perfumery

The benefits and virtues of anise Anise is a very fragrant and decorative aromatic plant. It is originally from the Mediterranean basin and displays an ancestral history. In addition, anise was already cultivated by the Egyptians over 4000 years ago and was thus exploited for its medicinal properties. Today, anise is recognized for its antispasmodic effects, treating difficult digestion problems or bloating. Moreover, contrary to what one would tend to think, anise is a remedy against halitosis, that is to say it helps to overcome bad breath. All you have to do is chew a few green anise seeds to...

Angelica in perfumery

Angelica in perfumery

Angelica, a plant with green notes Angelica is a source of inspiration for perfumers. If only by its name, but especially not its suave and green fragrances. The smell of angelica is powerful. Its notes are alternately herbaceous, woody, musky, peppery or powdery. Angelica is found in both male and female perfumes. Guerlain pays a vibrant tribute to angelica through its Angélique Noire fragrance for women. Here, the fresh and sincere accents of angelica are echoed in bergamot. All the fragrances finally bloom in voluptuous vanilla. Angelica is found either in the top, heart or even base notes, as in...

Dill in perfumery

Dill in perfumery

Dill is a culinary spice that readily flavors dishes around the world. Its leaves can be used fresh or dried to flavor all kinds of culinary preparations, including salads, fish, meats, cold soups or certain sauces. Its seeds can also be used for culinary use, in particular to flavor liqueurs or jams.The therapeutic use of dillIf its culinary use is undoubtedly the most widespread, know that dill is also renowned for its therapeutic virtues. Moreover, many benefits are associated with it. Dill infusion would be very effective in stimulating the digestive system. Formerly, it was also used to fight against...

Rosewood in perfumery

Rosewood in perfumery

The history of rosewood Rosewood is used to denote a scented wood used in perfumery. It comes directly to us from the Amazon rainforest and was discovered by botanists in 1925 in the Juriti Velho region. This tree was named rosewood because of its delicately scented and unconventional smell for bark. After study, he revealed its unexpected content of essential oil rich in linalool, a fragrant substance similar to lavender. This is how a flourishing industry around this tree developed in the Amazon basin in order to supply the region of Grasse. In the 1960s, rosewood essential oil production fluctuated...

Roman chamomile in perfumery

Roman chamomile in perfumery

Roman chamomile, a divine flower that exudes green apple The Roman chamomile, small flower of the fields, was consecrated by the Egyptians because it would be dedicated to Ra, the god of the sun. Its name comes from the ancient Greek meaning dwarf apple, recalling the pleasant scent it gives off. If many old herbaria note its beautiful existence, it is especially the United Kingdom which made it a favorite choice among its nine sacred flowers. Moreover, in order to delicately celebrate the silver jubilee of Queen Elisabeth II, the English house Penhaligon's created a famous perfume Jubilee Bouquet in...

Champagne in perfumery

Champagne in perfumery

Champagne, the myth of opulenceChampagne is inseparable from festive, convivial and special moments. This tradition goes back a long way since it is said that Clovis (King of the Franks) was baptized in Reims, in the capital of champagne. Each coronation which then took place in the same cathedral gave the right to parties where the local wine was drunk, therefore champagne, which was thus considered as the wine of the privileged. Later, Louis XIV, the Sun King, tasted champagne at the age of 16 and defined it as the symbol of his daring. Even much later, champagne was served...

Lemongrass in perfumery

Lemongrass in perfumery

Lemongrass: a grass with multiple powers! Contrary to what one might think, lemongrass has in common with lemon only the root of its name and the delicate fragrance that exudes from its long stems when rubbed. Indeed the grass with the long slender leaves native to Sri Lanka has hardly any other botanical points in common with the lemon. Known since the dawn of time by Asians, lemongrass was recognized in ancient Egypt for its multiple medicinal properties. Now growing in many tropical countries, lemongrass is traditionally used in the West Indies to lower fever and in Africa, it is...

Eucalyptus in perfumery

Eucalyptus in perfumery

The different types of eucalyptusEucalyptus is a tree of the myrtaceae family. The latter is native to Australia and moreover dominates 95% of the forests of this country thanks to its 600 species. Its growth is extremely fast and its unusual adaptation allows it to be present in many different environments. However, eucalyptus are generally not frost tolerant. Only the snow gum tree can withstand temperatures down to -20 °. Thus, certain species were introduced in Europe and acclimatized without any problem to the Mediterranean shores and in particular to the Portuguese climate. The shape of eucalyptus can be very...

Tarragon in perfumery

Tarragon in perfumery

Tarragon, a multifaceted aromatic note Tarragon is part of the aromatic olfactory family, just like lavender or rosemary. We find tarragon mainly in the top note and in masculine fragrances, because it gives off aromatic herbal fragrances. However, tarragon has other notes, slightly peppery and bitter notes. It even has a sweet smell reminiscent of fennel, anise or liquorice. Its aromas are fresh and powerful. Like here, in the Dolce & Gabanna Classic fragrance from Dolce & Gabanna. In this aromatic fragrance, tarragon is in the top note. With citrus notes, we dive into a lively freshness. The base of...