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Amyris in perfumery

Amyris in perfumery

Haitian sandalwood or amyris: a tree with a thousand virtues! Amyris, a beautiful tree typical of Haiti, is said to be part of the botanical family of citrus fruits. And yet its bark or its wood have absolutely nothing to do with the citrus scent of a lemon tree or an orange tree, quite the contrary! The scent of amyris is much closer to sandalwood, hence its name of Haitian sandalwood, adding the advantage of being perhaps more refined while being as effective in its wake as its venerable cousin so well known to perfumers. On the other hand, before...

Gaiac wood in perfumery

Gaiac wood in perfumery

The recent discovery of guaiac wood in perfumery The Latin origins of the small South American guaiac tree mean wood of life, perhaps because it is one of the densest and most resistant woods in the world. Thus guaiac wood, long before being exploited in perfumery or even for its medicinal virtues, was used to build certain parts of boats, wooden toys, furniture or even… bowling balls! However, the resin obtained from the bark of guaiac wood was recognized as early as 1884 as a medical remedy for its anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant, anti-rheumatic and even aphrodisiac properties! It was not until...

Wood in perfumery

Wood in perfumery

The different varieties of wood There are endless varieties of wood. Among the best known, we note mahogany, birch, cedar, cherry, oak, walnut, poplar, ebony, maple, pine Some varieties are very popular in perfumery, among which we note rosewood, sandalwood, cedar, birch. Sandalwood is one of the most popular woods for the nose. Sandalwood has always played an important role as much in religious rites as in personal prayers. In perfumery, sandalwood offers woody, soft, creamy and milky tones. Rosewood is also very popular and comes directly from the Amazon rainforest. It gives the compositions woody, floral and slightly spicy...

Cedar in perfumery

Cedar in perfumery

Virginia cedar or the smell of pencils Virginia cedar is widely used in essential oils, because it has always had many virtues. Indeed, it is a lymphatic and venous decongestant. It is also an antiseptic, a fungicide and an expectorant, and it is of great help in the fight against cellulite. In perfumery, we use red cedar, but also several varieties of cedar, such as atlas cedar, Chinese cedar or even Canadian white cedar. The smell of cedar is dry, green and resinous… It is an exact replica of the smell of pencil. The return of woody fragrances, for both...

Incense in perfumery

Incense in perfumery

Frankincense, the king of oriental perfumes Frankincense has a strong, but beautiful, camphoric, waxy, spicy and even peppery smell. Its smell can be reminiscent of the bark of woods, or of dusty wood that has just been waxed and even inside a church. Incense has a psychic, even spiritual, approach. In perfumery, it is integrated into very large perfumes, essentially oriental perfumes. We no longer cite the mythical Shalimar by Guerlain, the famous Opium by Yves Saint-Laurent or the perfume by Lancôme Nuit Trésor… In all these perfumes, incense is king! In oriental or gourmet perfumes, frankincense is often associated...

Cypriol in perfumery

Cypriol in perfumery

What is CypriolCypriol is a herbaceous plant whose morphology is very similar to that of papyrus. Thus, both belong to the genus Cyperus. Cypriol has erect, angular stems, bearing short, slender leaves with a brilliant green tint. Its aromatic rhizomes unfold through a very dense root system. Generally speaking, cypriol is a plant that grows in river beds, mainly in India. In this region, the use of this plant as a perfume has been known since the dawn of time. Indeed, the roots of cypriol were once used to perfume women's clothing including traditional saris. Thus, the use of cypriol...

Cypress in perfumery

Cypress in perfumery

Cypress, a widespread conifer Cypress is a tree of the Cupressaceae family and grows in temperate to warm regions of the northern hemisphere. Today there are at least 30 varieties. Very popular as an ornamental tree, the cypress grows as much in culture as it does in the wild. It is representative of the Mediterranean region and is famous for its triangular scale-shaped leaves, arranged in pairs and completely covering its twigs. For a very long time, the cypress has a very strong symbolic connotation. Greek antiquity made it a symbol of eternal life. Indeed, the foliage of the cypress...

Fir balsam in perfumery

Fir balsam in perfumery

The fir basalm of the balsam fir, emblem of North AmericaBalsam fir or Abies balsamea from its scientific name, is a species of fir in the pinaceae family. This one is native to North America and can reach 15 to 20 m in height while having a trunk of more than 60 cm in diameter. Generally pyramidal in shape, the balsam fir has a longevity of 70 to 150 years. It is embellished with many wooden cones of 5 to 10 cm, standing proudly on its twigs. The latter ripen in autumn and sublimate the many flat and non-prickly needles...

Iso E Super in perfumery

Iso E Super in perfumery

Iso E Super, an essential molecule for perfumers' paletteToday, perfume designers are very fond of this chemical molecule. It brings roundness (thanks to its velvet effect) and hold to the compositions. This molecule is classified in the woody olfactory family. The iso E Super gives perfumes a unique woody fragrance. This is mainly due to the bicyclic arborone molecule which itself has a very intense odor. Given its translucent color, the ISO E Super has no problem integrating the compositions. ISO E Super has a reputation for sticking to the skin today. This molecule effectively lends an indefinable radiation to...

Oak moss in perfumery

Oak moss in perfumery

Oakmoss, a complex smell Oakmoss gives off a more than complex smell. There are about 80 substances with different odors, so much so that no synthetic component can exactly reproduce the smell of oak moss. Its fragrance is strong, earthy, humid, moldy, woody and even slightly smoky at the same time. The smell of oak moss can make us think of mushrooms, undergrowth, leaves, but also of marine notes such as seaweed We can say that, at first glance, its olfactory note does not is not very attractive. Oakmoss is often used in base notes, as a fixer for volatile...

Tree moss in perfumery

Tree moss in perfumery

When wood and lichen transform to obtain precious scent essencesTake a stroll through the country woods that remain sheltered from city pollution and hectic human life and watch the trees and their layers of lichen, half mushroom half algae, grow quietly to be collected and transformed into winter and spring in an absolute that will become perfume. To produce 1 kg tree moss or oak moss absolute, it is necessary to collect 100 kg of moss, which is to say if the task is difficult! However, the tree moss mixed with solvents and then washed with alcohol will be recovered...

Woody Notes in perfumery

Woody Notes in perfumery

The history of woody notes If today, woody notes are very popular with our perfumers, this has not always been the case. Woody notes have become like the backbone of perfumes and it is rare not to find woody notes in a perfume. The perfumers have divided the woody notes into 6 categories, namely moss, amber, wet, smoky, resinous and dry woods. In ancient times, people used to burn wood shavings and resins in order to honor and pray to their Gods. Once is not custom, it is the talented Gabrielle Chanel who opened both woody fragrances. With Bois des...