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Perfume of the Accord Chypre

Perfume of the Accord Chypre

The evolution of chypre accords in perfumery In 1917, François Coty imagined a fragrance called chypre, then inventing a new family, that of chypres. The chypre accords are then built on a typical olfactory family, namely bergamot in the top note, a floral heart composed of jasmine or roses, and woody base notes such as oak moss or patchouli. The chypre accords are thus a great success and we notice that all the brands invented their chypre accord perfume like Guerlain with Cyprus of Paris in 1909, or Que Sais-je by Jean Patou and the famous Woman by Rochas. ....

Aromatic accord in perfumery

Aromatic accord in perfumery

Later, aromatic herbs were also used as raw materials to reveal predictions. The first real scent accords for beauty products made their appearance in the Middle Ages; a trend which was greatly amplified in the 17th century. From then on, aromatic herbs entered the composition of the traditional Eau de Cologne, very popular in the last century and constituting the beginnings of our current perfumery. In other words, the aromatic accord is a scent that is almost ingrained in our DNA. It is a timeless one that appeals to all generations, whether it is a female or male audience. The...

Absinthe in perfumery

Absinthe in perfumery

Absinthe, a plant that has become a strong alcohol Absinthe is a perennial herbaceous plant measuring between 50 cm and 1 m. This is covered with silky white and silvery hairs as well as numerous oil glands. Its leaves are silky on the underside while their tops are gray and greenish. Its flowers are yellow and tubular, united in flower heads. Although this is aromatic, it remains much more famous for its liquor than for its plant properties as such. However, wormwood turns out to be a plant with many medicinal properties as well as an excellent repellent for the...

Star anise in perfumery

Star anise in perfumery

Star anise, Chinese fennel or even star anise The star anise, fruit of the badan tree native to China, was brought back from its Asian land by the famous Marco Polo. However, its use intensified only several centuries later, star anise being expensive and having a bad reputation for attracting rodents in times of plague. Yet star anise or star anise, had a famous lover who lost her mind… Marie-Antoinette! She cultivated the badanier quite simply for its aesthetic aspect and for the divine smell of its fruits once dry. It was not until the 18th century that we really...

Mugwort in perfumery

Mugwort in perfumery

Mugwort, a scent of the aromatic family Olfactory, we describe mugwort as camphoric, fresh, herbaceous and bitter. Mugwort is part of the aromatic olfactory family, just like thyme, lavender or rosemary. Mugwort is mainly used in men's perfumery. The virile character of mugwort makes the fragrances that compose it a major asset for designers. Many perfumers have already created exceptional perfumes that place mugwort as a top note, as in Declaration by Cartier, 1998. Here, mugwort is one of the top notes associated with tangerine, cilantro and neroli. The heart notes are softer with jasmine, iris and cardamom. In base...

Anise in perfumery

Anise in perfumery

The benefits and virtues of anise Anise is a very fragrant and decorative aromatic plant. It is originally from the Mediterranean basin and displays an ancestral history. In addition, anise was already cultivated by the Egyptians over 4000 years ago and was thus exploited for its medicinal properties. Today, anise is recognized for its antispasmodic effects, treating difficult digestion problems or bloating. Moreover, contrary to what one would tend to think, anise is a remedy against halitosis, that is to say it helps to overcome bad breath. All you have to do is chew a few green anise seeds to...

Animalis in perfumery

Animalis in perfumery

Animalis: When the smell of wild animals becomes a perfume! The animal note or the delicate scent of sweat from changing rooms, dirty socks, Male… is still dreaming! In reality, the animal note is addressed above all to virility, to all the masculinity of male perfumes. The animalis base, present in a notable way in few perfumes but certainly copied in many others, wants to reproduce the animality of our clean and too well ordered men. The animalis base or the synthesis of masculine animal notes Historically, animal notes were part of the great fragrances that these gentlemen liked to...

Angelica in perfumery

Angelica in perfumery

Angelica, a plant with green notes Angelica is a source of inspiration for perfumers. If only by its name, but especially not its suave and green fragrances. The smell of angelica is powerful. Its notes are alternately herbaceous, woody, musky, peppery or powdery. Angelica is found in both male and female perfumes. Guerlain pays a vibrant tribute to angelica through its Angélique Noire fragrance for women. Here, the fresh and sincere accents of angelica are echoed in bergamot. All the fragrances finally bloom in voluptuous vanilla. Angelica is found either in the top, heart or even base notes, as in...

Dill in perfumery

Dill in perfumery

Dill is a culinary spice that readily flavors dishes around the world. Its leaves can be used fresh or dried to flavor all kinds of culinary preparations, including salads, fish, meats, cold soups or certain sauces. Its seeds can also be used for culinary use, in particular to flavor liqueurs or jams.The therapeutic use of dillIf its culinary use is undoubtedly the most widespread, know that dill is also renowned for its therapeutic virtues. Moreover, many benefits are associated with it. Dill infusion would be very effective in stimulating the digestive system. Formerly, it was also used to fight against...

Amyris in perfumery

Amyris in perfumery

Haitian sandalwood or amyris: a tree with a thousand virtues! Amyris, a beautiful tree typical of Haiti, is said to be part of the botanical family of citrus fruits. And yet its bark or its wood have absolutely nothing to do with the citrus scent of a lemon tree or an orange tree, quite the contrary! The scent of amyris is much closer to sandalwood, hence its name of Haitian sandalwood, adding the advantage of being perhaps more refined while being as effective in its wake as its venerable cousin so well known to perfumers. On the other hand, before...

Ambrette in perfumery

Ambrette in perfumery

Ambrette, the musk seed Ambrette gives off an amber, powdery, musky, slightly animal fragrance. In fact, ambrette is often referred to as plant musk, so much so that it is often used as an alternative to musk of animal origin. Ambrette also offers floral and fruity notes resembling pear or plum. You should know that ambrette is considered a seductive, warm and sensual note. Also we find it mainly in base note of oriental, amber or chypre perfumes. This is the case for the fragrance Désir pour Femme by Rochas. The ambrette in base note is associated with patchouli and...

Ambergris in perfumery

Ambergris in perfumery

The warm notes of amber The smell of ambergris varies depending on the origin of the stone blocks and their floating time. As a result, amber offers many facets. Woody, camphoric, animal, even faecal odors, smells of tobacco, musk, but also notes of sea, seaweed, sea urchins or even dead fish Anyway, ambergris is renowned for its warm notes. Amber gives warmth, tenacity and even a sweet sensuality to the wearer. In addition, it brings to the compositions, a harmony that one rarely finds with other raw materials. A very beautiful tribute is paid to him with the perfume Ambre...

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