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Carrot in perfumery

Carrot in perfumery

As surprising as it may seem, the note of carrot, or rather carrot seeds, creates powdery facets with pretty woody, floral or even oriental scents.    The carrot, this beautiful umbellifer with multiple qualities! The carrot is part of the umbelliferous family just like the parsley, the fennel Although discovered more than 5000 years ago in the wild in Afghanistan, the carrot which was brown, white, green or yellow was not cultivated in Europe only in the 16th century. Moreover, the orange carrot that we know is the fruit of the hand of man in the same 16th century! It...

Cassie in perfumery

Cassie in perfumery

Cassie, notes of mimosa The blackcurrant flower gives off a dense, very floral scent that immediately recalls that of mimosa. It also has a side reminiscent of the violet flower with a little honeyed aspect. The fragrances of the cassie flower are floral to perfection, a little spicy, but very intoxicating. Cassie absolute has the particularity of associating a pronounced floral note with a powdery tone. The cassie flower has unique notes that cannot be found anywhere else. Many perfumes honor this very special flower. We note, among others, Aqua Allegoria (Grossellina) by Guerlain, Murmure by Van Cleef & Arpels...

Tonka bean in perfumery

Tonka bean in perfumery

Teak, tonka bean and coumarin Brazilian teak, native to the Caribbean and South America, produces to its full height many small fruits which are called tonka beans. In its raw state, the flavor of the tonka bean is roasted and almondy, reminiscent of caramel or dried hay, but it is during its transformation that the magic operates! Once harvested, the tonka bean is dried and then macerated for 24 hours in rum to be dried again after operation. As a result of these transformations, small coumarin crystals appear on the surface and they are the ones that will give the...

Iris in perfumery

Iris in perfumery

Origin, characteristics and use of the iris Perfumeries look for certain species of iris for their rhizome, it is the underground stem of the flower because in the iris, the stem is used to make perfumes. We use a species that comes from Florence in Italy, iris germanica, then iris pallida, also cultivated in Italy and Morocco, to obtain the essence of iris by distilling it. Iris is one of the most expensive raw materials because it has to be dried for three years before distilling it, so profitability is low. One ton of iris is used to distill just...

Mimosa in perfumery

Mimosa in perfumery

Characteristics and use of mimosa Mimosa grows in siliceous and dry soils. The mimosa tree can grow up to about 20 m tall. The mimosa flowers are like small, velvety and silky yellow pompoms. These mimosa flowers are hermaphroditic and reproduce by entomogamy (pollination by insects). The fruits of the mimosa are brown pods that are a little flattened. The twigs of the mimosa are not thorny, they are velvety, and its leaves are compound. You can see mimosas in the wild in France because some have escaped crops. Since 2003, this species has been part of the Fabaceae family,...

Violet in perfumery

Violet in perfumery

Characteristics of violet flower Violet belongs to the purplish family of perennials. The fragrant violet is one of the few fragrant varieties. It is a plant of 5 to 15 cm with a thick stump with an elongated stolon. The violet has oval stipules bordered by fringes and leaves in the form of rounded teeth near the root. The color of most violets is dark purple, in a few rare cases they are white. The flowering period of the violet is in the spring. It grows in woods, meadows and hedges.When you breathe violet, its scent is pleasant but it...

Heliotrope in perfumery

Heliotrope in perfumery

What is heliotropeHeliotropes are plants belonging to the Boraginaceae family, that is to say herbaceous plants that produce essential oils. They are also called “Herbes de Saint Fiacre”. The latter owe their name to the fact that their leaves turn towards the sun. In total, there are about 250 species in the world, the latter mainly inhabiting the subtropics. In Europe, they are more particularly located in the Mediterranean region. However, those most commonly used in perfumery are heliotropes originating in South America. The latter have a blue, purple or white tint and are often equated with the spring season.Heliotrope...