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Mangosteen in perfumery

Mangosteen, a typical Thai fruit

Mangosteen comes from a flowering plant. Its tropical tree is widespread in the Malay archipelagos, Indonesia and Thailand. Famous in Southeast Asia, the mangosteen is a small fruit that has nevertheless been introduced to other parts of the world such as India, Sri Lanka, Puerto Rico, Florida or South America. Spherical in shape, and 6 to 8 cm in diameter, it has a dark purple hue and is highly sought after for its excellent white flesh, very similar in appearance to that of lychee. In addition, in addition to its taste properties, mangosteen is also famous for its healing powers.

Mangosteen in the kitchen

Mangosteen is appreciated in cooking for its juicy flesh and tangy taste. Note, however, that it is still quite difficult to find outside of typically Asian grocery stores, because it is a product subject to significant restrictions. Delicate to import, mangosteen is rather available canned or frozen in Western countries.

Mangosteen in traditional medicine

In Asia, mangosteen is widely used in traditional medicine. It is used in particular to treat skin infections, wounds, dysentery or infections of the urinary tract, and gastrointestinal tract. Medicines are developed based on its dried fruits, even if, to date, no scientific evidence has been provided to support its effectiveness on human diseases.

Mangosteen in perfumery

But let's come back to the part that interests us the most: perfumery. Like most fruits, mangosteen cannot directly give rise to a fragrant extract. Its scent must therefore be reproduced in the laboratory. Rather intended for mixed and feminine scents, mangosteen gives off a sweet and tangy note, in perfect harmony with the gourmet scents of our time. Moreover, beyond its very appetizing breath, it remains very airy and refreshing. Although atypical, the mangosteen has already had plenty of time to integrate several world-famous fragrances such as Cool Water Intense For Her by Davidoff or Majoromantica by Shiseido.

Finally, note that the other parts of the mangosteen tree are also used. Its twigs are used as chewing sticks in Ghana. Its wood is used to make spears and cabinetry in Thailand. Its bark is used to tan leather in China.

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