SHOW SIDEBAR
Paradisone in perfumery

The importance of jasmine in perfumery

There are no less than 300 different species of jasmine. Nevertheless, it is jasmine grandiflorum that interests all perfumers. The latter is very delicate. It requires exposure to the south and does not like cold winters or wet winters. Its foliage is lovely, and its white flower is starry and fragile, which is why it is collected at dawn, just before the appearance of the sun. Until 1930, jasmine was the primary production of Grasse. Since 1970, this jasmine has been entirely devoted to Chanel. Other farms then began to replant jasmine, mainly the Domaine de Manon. Its jasmine production is entirely reserved for the house of Dior. The culture of jasmine moved to Egypt, then to Morocco, then to India, but the scent was not quite the same as that of grandiflorum. Faced with this lack of jasmine, it was Doctor Édouard Demole from Firmenich who had the idea of ​​transmitting its scent synthetically, first with hedonia, then with paradisone.

The use of paradisone in perfumery

Like jasmine, paradisone is used in all olfactory families. The chemical molecule is found indifferently in male or female compositions. Paradisone is found in woody scents like in “Acqua Di Gio Essenza” by Armani. Here, paradisone is located in the heart note associated with jasmine. Another woody-aromatic that contains paradisone is “Pi Air” by Givenchy. Still, we can find paradisone in an oriental-woody like in “Mon Guerlain” by Guerlain, which here associates paradisone with jasmine. Another oriental that contains paradise is “Bikini Questa Sera” by Christian Louboutin. Paradisone can be related to all other fragrances. It is found in many fragrances, including Eau Océane by Biotherm, “Shadow and Light” by Armani, or “CK All” by Calvin Klein.

An alternative to jasmine, paradisone is a fragrant molecule. More powerful and purer than hedon, paradisone wonderfully represents the olfactory scent of jasmine. As such, it fits wonderfully into all olfactory families.

TAGS:

Leave A Comment

Please note, comments must be approved before they are published