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Syringa in perfumery Inspired by

The syringa, the white flower that lights up the garden

The syringa is native to China and North America, especially Quebec where its fragrant flowers have been appreciated for centuries in parks and gardens. However, it was the hybrid versions of syringa created by 19th century gardeners that brought this magical and intense scent to its gentle flowering.

It was natural that perfumery wanted to use this sweet scent to make floral arrangements. However, like other plants, you cannot extract essential oil from syringa. As a result, each major perfume house has been able to develop its own magic formula to recreate the syringa in our favorite bottles!

The syringa note in our flowery fragrances

The syringa note is obviously totally adapted to flowery perfumes and open on beautiful compositions of white, sweet, fruity and vaporous flowers.
One of the very first to have a syringa note was the pretty Eau de Camille by Annick Goutal which opens with top notes of honeysuckle and syringa to offer green floral notes, refined and tender, to the luster. image of the daughter of the designer to whom she dedicated this sweet fragrance.

Then Eau Belle by Azzaro adds to this flowery and aromatic trail of syringa, citrus fruits which pep up this beautiful water. It then spreads on an exquisite floral note to end with a bath of soft amber and delicately sensual warmth ...

However, the fragrant and delicate note of syringa will quickly return to the flowery fragrances of its origin, dedicating itself, almost exclusively, to pure and charming top notes or deep and intoxicating heart notes of bucolic flights. So many perfumes play with this note both orange and floral to give, depending on the associations, the tenderness of sweetness or the tangy freshness of a citrus flower. Like “Contradiction” by Calvin Klein, “Tender Touch Women” by Burberry or even “Aqua Allegoria Flora Nymphea” by Guerlain.

The syringa note, thanks to its multiple facets, allows to highlight the flowery notes or even some citrus of its sparkling and its grace. Very often used, it would seem particularly intended for a female audience, even at its beginnings for an audience of young women. However, there is still a male perfume containing a note of syringa, it is the citrus “Immense pour Homme” by Jean-Louis Scherrer. Despite this exception, which confirms the rule, the delicate scent of syringa seems to flourish much better in feminine than masculine perfumes. For the moment...

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